Tues, 09 19, 2017

Writing

Today's post is an interview with Tiffany T. Cole, a freelance editor and a copy editor for Limitless Publishing and the Purdue University Chronicle. She has edited and critiqued dozens of newspaper articles and dozens of books, fiction and nonfiction alike, in a variety of genres. Before that, she was an editorial assistant for Month9Books and the president of Reader’s Den, a website where she reviewed and promoted books for self-published authors and traditionally published authors for two years.


Have you ever loved someone so much and been so disappointed at the same time? I recently spoke to a friend - who hopefully doesn't read my blog-, and she was on the verge of tears about life and how nothing was working in her favor. While I listened with a sympathetic ear, I admit I was really thinking, shut up and get up already!


There is a pancake house in my area that has the brightest sign on the street. Electric blues, yellows and pinks flash across the screen advertising specials and hours of operation. Among all the other businesses, this restaurant is impossible to miss. It's as visually loud as those Starship Enterprise klaxons warning everyone aboard of danger. It nearly blinds me when I drive past it day or night. If the purpose of the bright, annoying sign is to bring attention to the business, mission accomplished.

2e1ax simplistic frontpage Whats-your-writing-poisonWell, I've finally figured out how to add pages to my menu. It's as if I've been dropped into a different world in getting use to Wordpress. And that feeling enhanced the past week since my adapter stopped working on me. It wasn't charging my Chromebook, which then slipped into a coma. And was only revived recently last week Friday.

At one time, I would have never considered querying a small press. To be honest, with everyone either self-publishing or working toward obtaining a publishing deal with a traditional press, I just wasn't exposed to information about small presses. Until I attended a conference hosted by the Indiana Writers' Consortium. I am thankful to Mari Barnes, founder of Flying Turtle Publishing, for providing me--and now you-- the pros and cons of going with a small press.


The first draft of anything isn't necessarily your best draft. It's raw, crude, without a lot of plot form and may even be junk.

You know, something you really shouldn't turn in for a grade or for publication.


Now that I've been active in the pursuit of writing and publishing, I've had some friends approach me about helping them write some significant aspect of their life. Since I believe everyone has a story to tell, I'm always ready with an enthusiastic, "Sure!" But then the punch to the gut follows when they preface the rest of their request with: "Well, when you become a real writer..."